Diabetes in Hospital #18ADC Research

Melinda Seed writes for Twice Diabetes

Diabetes care amongst hospital inpatients, as I mentioned here, was a topic of focus at the recent Australian Diabetes Congress #18ADC. I have highlighted this as an issue of concern before here and here and the anecdotes of hospitalised people with type 1 make alarming reading.

Whilst there was an overwhelming acknowledgement that there is much room for improvement in this area I remain concerned about the lack of concern around how quickly people with type 1 can suffer serious consequences of too much or too little insulin. There was no differentiation between the way that insulin-dependent, non-insulin dependent but on insulin and not on insulin ‘diabetes’ patients were being ‘managed’ in the presentations made from hospitals. Whilst the data recording systems that are reviewed by a nurse educator every 3 days (!) are great to identify type 2 patients who need a treatment review because of persistently high sugars etc. It’s too late if a type 1 is in DKA for a DNE educator to look at where their sugars were three days ago. I was struck by the lack of urgency in type 1-again I think this comes down to stigma about diabetes in general and a lack of understanding and appreciation that type 1s are walking a tightrope between severe hypoglycaemia and DKA every day-the state of “dangerous safety” that Banting referred to some time after he developed the 20th century wonder-‘drug’ insulin.

A really bright spot amongst the presentations was one by Rebecca Munt, a PHD candidate with a nursing background who also trains Diabetes Educators. Rebecca’s research was on the experience of people with type 1 whilst being an inpatient. I LOVE this way of bringing the voice of people with diabetes into the healthcare discussion.

This is what Rebecca presented as what we already know (telling and a bit alarming)

Rebecca’s research involved focus groups and interviews with t1s who’d been hospitalised in the last few years and a theory on this experience was suggested and co-designed with the research participants (that’s my very rough attempt to explain constructivist grounded theory-if I’ve got it wrong I hope somebody will tell me).

What Rebecca found was:

This really resonates with my experiences in hospital and with the many stories I’ve heard from type 1 friends and acquaintances. We are not being difficult, we have good evidence to support the fact that HCPs in hospital settings are quite ignorant about type 1 diabetes and we need to be vigilant to keep ourselves safe. We manage our diabetes 24/7, self-management should be the default situation unless we are truly mentally incapacitated.

Some years back the British Medical Journal published a great, type 1 diabetes specific article titled, What happens when you know more than your Doctor, amongst its findings:

Patients who have in-depth knowledge of their condition encounter problems when their expertise is seen as inappropriate in standard healthcare interactions, and expertise taught to patients in one branch of medicine can be considered non-compliant by those who are not specialists in that field.

Although patient education can give people confidence in their own self-management skills, it cannot solve the power imbalance that remains when a generalist healthcare professional, however well meaning, blocks access to medication and supplies needed to manage chronic diseases successfully.

 

https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/3/11/e003583?cpetoc

This quote really sums it up for me!

PS. I was overjoyed that Rebecca’s presentation was awarded the best ADEA Abstract at the 2018 Australian Diabetes Congress #18ADC. I really hope that the HCPs who need to hear this were listening!

4 thoughts on “Diabetes in Hospital #18ADC Research

  1. I was part of Rebecca’s study. I spoke to her a couple of times o the phone, and I’m really thrilled that she was awarded the best abstract. It’s taken her a lot of work. Yippee!!!!

  2. I couldn’t agree more Mel! Ditto!
    I have recently been hospitalised with Influenza A virus and the treatment I got was for that of a T2D. In fact this has been the norm for the past 20 or 30 years of my T1D. WE NEED A NEW NAME! We need the T1D orgs to represent us when misinformation about “diabetes”appears in the media. That way and only that way will mean that lecturers at Uni, older GPs, Nurses and Nursing lecturers, academics, writers, journalists, government and policy makers alike will be correctly informed about the differences between T1D and T2D. I also recently corrected a psychology text book in a chapter that featured “obesity” and the sentence that the Publisher and Author corrected for me was “Obesity leads to diabetes…”!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!v This was in a TEXTBOOK!I also spend on average once a week, writing to journalists who have made the same mistake with not a single mention of Auto-immune disease causing T1D. Also, Medicos and the hospital nursing profession will never change treatments and behaviour if the majority of people in hospitals have 90% of the form of diabetes that is T2D. T1D is only 10%. We need more representation and we need to differentiate ourselves from the type 2 diabetes majority. It is a fact that diabetes consists of approximately (see AIHW stats) 90% T2D, 9% T1D and a smaller percentage Gestational, LADA, among others etc!
    It’s a win win situation to call T1D a different name!

  3. Thank you so much Melinda for taking the time to write about Diabetes management in hospital and including my research. It is certainly an area I am very passionate about and can only hope that my research findings can really help to change practice and change the thinking about the expert patient/ person with T1 in hospital. The fact that my findings have resonated with you strengthens my research so thank you

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