Tag Archives: #18ADC

Diabetes in Hospital #18ADC Research

Melinda Seed writes for Twice Diabetes

Diabetes care amongst hospital inpatients, as I mentioned here, was a topic of focus at the recent Australian Diabetes Congress #18ADC. I have highlighted this as an issue of concern before here and here and the anecdotes of hospitalised people with type 1 make alarming reading.

Whilst there was an overwhelming acknowledgement that there is much room for improvement in this area I remain concerned about the lack of concern around how quickly people with type 1 can suffer serious consequences of too much or too little insulin. There was no differentiation between the way that insulin-dependent, non-insulin dependent but on insulin and not on insulin ‘diabetes’ patients were being ‘managed’ in the presentations made from hospitals. Whilst the data recording systems that are reviewed by a nurse educator every 3 days (!) are great to identify type 2 patients who need a treatment review because of persistently high sugars etc. It’s too late if a type 1 is in DKA for a DNE educator to look at where their sugars were three days ago. I was struck by the lack of urgency in type 1-again I think this comes down to stigma about diabetes in general and a lack of understanding and appreciation that type 1s are walking a tightrope between severe hypoglycaemia and DKA every day-the state of “dangerous safety” that Banting referred to some time after he developed the 20th century wonder-‘drug’ insulin.

A really bright spot amongst the presentations was one by Rebecca Munt, a PHD candidate with a nursing background who also trains Diabetes Educators. Rebecca’s research was on the experience of people with type 1 whilst being an inpatient. I LOVE this way of bringing the voice of people with diabetes into the healthcare discussion.

This is what Rebecca presented as what we already know (telling and a bit alarming)

Rebecca’s research involved focus groups and interviews with t1s who’d been hospitalised in the last few years and a theory on this experience was suggested and co-designed with the research participants (that’s my very rough attempt to explain constructivist grounded theory-if I’ve got it wrong I hope somebody will tell me).

What Rebecca found was:

This really resonates with my experiences in hospital and with the many stories I’ve heard from type 1 friends and acquaintances. We are not being difficult, we have good evidence to support the fact that HCPs in hospital settings are quite ignorant about type 1 diabetes and we need to be vigilant to keep ourselves safe. We manage our diabetes 24/7, self-management should be the default situation unless we are truly mentally incapacitated.

Some years back the British Medical Journal published a great, type 1 diabetes specific article titled, What happens when you know more than your Doctor, amongst its findings:

Patients who have in-depth knowledge of their condition encounter problems when their expertise is seen as inappropriate in standard healthcare interactions, and expertise taught to patients in one branch of medicine can be considered non-compliant by those who are not specialists in that field.

Although patient education can give people confidence in their own self-management skills, it cannot solve the power imbalance that remains when a generalist healthcare professional, however well meaning, blocks access to medication and supplies needed to manage chronic diseases successfully.

 

https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/3/11/e003583?cpetoc

This quote really sums it up for me!

PS. I was overjoyed that Rebecca’s presentation was awarded the best ADEA Abstract at the 2018 Australian Diabetes Congress #18ADC. I really hope that the HCPs who need to hear this were listening!

MAJOR SYDNEY HOSPITAL DENIES DIABETES CARE BECAUSE…

Melinda Seed writes for Twice Diabetes

I am still seething about a presentation at Australasian Diabetes Congress 2018, #18adc that discussed the results of a 12 month review of an “Insulin Dose Adjustment Clinic”, in a major teaching hospital in innerEastern-Sydney.

This was the least patient-centric, most egregiously substandard research methodology and ethically questionable thing I’ve seen presented. I know these are strong words but I stand by them not least because people with diabetes who attend this so-called clinic are being denied adequate care if the centre’s actions are truly the way they were presented in this talk, I have no reason to doubt what was presented but if some of the illustrious names associated with this hospital want to correct or clarify things, I’d be delighted to hear from them:

Substandard Research Methodology and Ethically Questionable.

Several times during the presentation the Registered Nurse and Credentialed Diabetes Educator making the presentation said that over a year,  7% of total referees to the clinic were discharged from our care” for non-adherence AND this was in addition to the 20% of patients who were discharged because they didn’t respond to 2 attempts at phone contact.  In total, 33% of people referred to the clinic did not complete the insulin dose adjustment clinic-if you were a business and 1/3rd of your customers didn’t return you’d be out of business/our of a job pretty quickly.


So why is this a substandard (as in it wouldn’t pass a High School research project test) research methodology? Simply because of an abject failure to define their terms.  

When asked by an audience member what the definition of non-adherence that led to discharge was, the response was cringe-worthy.  “Oh it’s a bit subjective I suppose… you can just tell”

EXCUSE ME YOU CAN JUST TELL??????????????????

How foolish of those of us questioning this presenter,  I didn’t realise that clairvoyance was a skill utilised by public servants employed as health care professionals in NSW hospitals.

This is the most outrageous insult to ‘research’, to people with diabetes and  to the many dedicated and diligent health professionals who are slaving their guts out to help people.

The look on my face to the “you can just tell” response elicited the follow-up “you don’t agree”- OH GOOD GRIEF, I said no and the response after an embarrassingly awkward pause where this professional looked bewildered that somebody would question her ability to “just know” something  was …………….”Sometimes they’re rude”

WE ARE DENYING PUBLIC HEALTHCARE TO PEOPLE IN AUSTRALIA FOR UNDEFINED REASONS INCLUDING A SUBJECTIVE ASSESSMENT OF RUDENESS??????? No not abusive or physically threatening, no just “rude”.

I suggest person who is a  RN CDE that you go spend half an hour in the Emergency Department of your hospital where your saintly colleagues are being regularly abused and spat upon by people in mental health and/or substance abuse crisis and learn what health care is all about.  It’s an insult to all those hard working professionals who are subjected to verbal abuse and threats and yet they soldier on because they know they have a responsibility to save lives.

How dare you deny medical treatment paid for by Australian taxpayers for reasons you cannot even define.  YOU SHOULD NOT HAVE THAT RIGHT! In fact I’d argue you’re bringing your whole profession into disrepute.

As you can tell I’m furious about this but not despairing.  The reason I’m not totally despairing is not only do I personally know many health care professionals who aren’t like this, but there were good questions from the audience of healthcare professionals who were obviously also concerned about the nature of this presentation but during the conference I had a couple of quiet chats with CDEs I hadn’t met before. They worked in public hospitals, one just on the other side of Sydney from the offending party mentioned above, the other in the ACT. They gave me hope, their compassion, their understanding of the difficulties of diabetes care both from the patient and the practitioner perspective and their horror at the lack of professionalism in discharging somebody for non-adherence showed me that despite a few bad apples (or in this case it appears an entire diabetes “unit”) kind, compassionate, and competent care is out there you just need to sort the small amount of dirt from the gold.