Tag Archives: health misinformation

Incredible Bulldust from Supposedly Credible Sources

Melinda Seed writes for Twice Diabetes

“Health Professionals should direct patients to credible online sources” this is the mantra of those wanting to continue to control the information people with health conditions can access.

Well, what is a credible site Diabetes NSW?  The IDF?

The National Health Service of the UK (NHS)? They run all health services in the UK and are government owned & controlled, surely they would be credible?

Here’s an offering from one part of the NHS posted on 17th November 2017.  It looks like an ad sponsored by Big Food. Imagine the outcry if Coca-Cola DID run an ad like this! This is misleading and just plain WRONG. Potatoes contain carbs but it is not simple sugar and the metabolic and nutritional impact is WAY different from that of Coke or orange juice (which looks surprisingly low in sugar in that pic to me).  This tweet-a picture of a display the diabetes nurses of the NHS took to a local shopping centre is so wrong, so potentially damaging and so misleading, I am beyond words.(Just kidding I can nearly always find the words to rant.)

Despite initially defending the tweet for quite some time, the West Suffolk NHS did delete it but I’m just leaving it here for the next time somebody starts dissing people with diabetes sharing health information on line.* Get your own houses in order first!

 

*West Suffolk NHS are by no means the only “credible” organisation disseminating misleading information. Health information is complex and doesn’t lend itself well to sound bytes and tweets. The sooner public health promotion officers realise this the better.

In the interests of balance, here is a useful infographic produced by people with diabetes. Note it doesn’t promote branded products, includes quantities and is relevant to the season at hand-Thanksgiving and Christmas are particularly times when you eat foods out of the ordinary, so a quick guide to carbs is helpful.  Kudos to the people at Beyond Type 1.